On Saturday, October 3, 2020 the Manchester Rotary Club will be hosting Rotary in Motion, a community outing for people of all abilities, in addition to the celebration of the long-anticipated dedication of the Michael B. Lynch Memorial Pavilion at Charter Oak Park.
It is safe to say that 2020 has not been the year we anticipated. The start of a new decade is bound to bring about change, but the historic moments and challenges that have faced us this year have led to the need for significantly greater change.
One of the most important and meaningful projects undertaken in the Boy Scouts of America organization is the Eagle Project. It is a requirement for becoming an Eagle Scout, which is the highest honor and rank a Boy Scout can achieve.
By now almost all of Manchester’s residents (and residents of others towns) have heard the news of the town approving a plan to develop the blighted Broad Street Parkade.  Manchester Board of Directors made the decision unanimously in early August.
The Black Lives Matter protests currently sweeping the country have been labeled by many as part of the new civil rights movement. This broader national movement has brought long-needed change with it, from the removal of statues honoring racist figureheads to police reform and policy change.
I’m not from Manchester. That feels like a good place to start before diving into what is going to be (spoiler alert) a pretty honest conversation about communication in this town. I might not be from here, but I am proud to be here.
Protests in support of the Black Lives Matter Movement have taken place around the world, across the United States, and even Manchester, CT. With protests appearing to have peaked on Juneteenth, what happens now?
The COVID-19 pandemic has changed nearly all aspects of daily life, especially weekly trips to the grocery store. Trying to avoid crowds, find all the items needed, and stay safe has made these grocery trips all the more stressful. Luckily, there is another option
I may not be able to define trash but I know it when I see it. For most of us, this expression probably rings true. Beer cans, plastic bottles and other plastic debris have no place in our woods and around our public spaces, that much we can agree on.
As a result of the boredom of quarantine and the cancellation of Manchester’s 4th of July Fireworks, many have been setting off their own leading to a rise in complaints. This has been occurring not only in Manchester, but across the country. New York Daily News reported that fireworks complaints had skyrocketed in New York City, with some blaming them on quarantine boredom.
Translate »